Resources By Type

The ACE resources below are organized by type to help you find the right resource more quickly. Select a type to see a list and descriptions of corresponding resources.

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Doctor reviewing form with patient

The purpose of this website is to provide monthly research summaries of the most pertinent articles related to abuse, as a support for those whose goal is to create a future of violence-free families. From Stanford University and the National Library of Medicine.

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The purpose of this Resource Guide is to provide strategies and information to help you learn more about how your health plan can be an active part of Trauma-Informed Networks of Care in your service areas.

This joint letter from the California Department of Social Services, the California Department of Health Care Services, and the Office of the California Surgeon General provides clarifying guidance on the responsibilities of health care clinical teams who conduct screenings for Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) in the context of the state’s mandated reporting requirements.

This case study describes the experience of Marin Community Clinics in obtaining buy-in for piloting and designing the implementation process for organization-wide ACE screening. It reinforces the importance ACEs Aware places on developing a robust implementation team, training staff on trauma-informed care and ACE screening, and expanding internal and external resources to respond to ACEs and toxic stress.

This document describes a framework to guide communities’ (“community” refers to any group with shared interests such as neighborhoods, counties, states, and professional groups) activities that will support the types of relationships and environments that help children grow up to be healthy and productive members of their communities so that they, in turn, can build stronger and safer families and communities for their children.

Grantee: Safe & Sound

The removal of children by the child welfare system is both a result and cause of ACEs. This paper outlines data which reveal inequities in the current child welfare system of California, reviews the evidence suggesting harms of over-surveillance and separation, and highlights policy actions and community-based solutions that have the potential to shift agency and resources to families who have been marginalized.

Families Thrive is a Contra Costa, CA-based cross-sectoral partnership to address needs of children and families impacted by trauma, including intimate partner violence.

MARC is a learning collaborative of 14 communities across the US engaged in building a movement for a just, healthy, and resilient world, in which they share best practices and receive financial and technical assistance in advancing ACEs-informed work across sectors, including early childhood education, aging, healthcare, and juvenile justice.

Grantee: UCSF Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies

This practice paper examines ACEs and ACE screening with immigrant youth, including qualitative research conducted with adolescent health providers and adolescents to understand their perspectives on this topic, and offers recommendations for adolescent health providers to effectively implement ACE screening with immigrant youth in primary care settings. This paper is a companion document to the authors’ practice paper entitled Screening Adolescents for Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs): Incorporating Resilience and Youth Development.